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Dementia programming

Dementia programming in museums has been shown to improve relationships between those living with dementia and their carers.

The measure

Targeted programming in museums has been shown to improve relationships between those living with dementia and their carers.

The research

Originally based on research conducted in the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City, the findings presented by Rosenberg in Meet Me: Making Art Accessible to People with Dementia (2009) have been mirrored in studies across North America and Europe, including the practise-based research project ARTEMIS (ART Encounters: Museum Intervention Study) at the Frankfurt Stadel Museum. These studies have found that museum interventions are able to raise the well-being and quality of life of those with mild to moderate dementia and their care partners, specifically encouraging increased interaction. 

Museums and dementia programming

Many of Scotland’s museums run programming for older people living with dementia, and while the benefits of this programming have been shown in a number of ways, the clearest evidence has been demonstrated in the improved wellness indicators of both those living with memory loss and those who care for them. This has been found to be true not only for those carers who attend sessions, but also for those who work with the dementia sufferers at other times, showing that the benefits of reminiscence sessions last well beyond the time period of the session itself, and go beyond the direct beneficiaries.

Collecting your evidence

We know that a range of museums offer programming that supports older people and those living with memory loss. To effectively demonstrate the social value of this programming, we encourage museums to share this high-level statement, based on Rosenberg’s study, and then to indicate how their own museum programming engages with this information. This could include numbers of sessions run for older visitors per year, or numbers of attendees at sessions including reminiscence, object handling, music, or dance components.

Museum example

Sporting Memories, a project run by the Scottish Football Museum in partnership with Sports Heritage Scotland, offers supported reminiscence and handling sessions centred around sporting photographs, collections, and personal memorabilia for older people and those living with memory loss or related conditions. Last year, they worked with more than 2500 older people through their drop-in sessions, thereby making an extraordinary impact on the lives of those older people and their carers.

Reference

Francesca Rosenberg, Meet Me: Making Art Accessible to People with Dementia (2009) 

A Schall, VA Tesky, and J Pantel, 'Art-based museum intervention (ARTEMIS) to improve emotional well-being and quality of life in people with dementia and their care partners', Alzheimer's & Dementia (2017) 

What to do next

Please explore our advocacy materials to better understand how you can effectively use this information within your wider organisational advocacy approach.