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Restitution And Repatriation Resources

Introduction

The following resources examine restitution and repatriation in practice.

The Collections Trust define restitution as 'the process by which cultural objects are returned to an individual or a community. Repatriation is the process by which cultural objects are returned to a nation or state at the request of a government.'

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Resources

The Collections Trust restitution and repatriation section includes examples of procedures some museums use and resources for researching and processing a claim.

The Open Restitution Project is an Africa-led project seeking to open up access to information on restitution of African material culture and human ancestors, to empower all stakeholders involved to make knowledge-based decisions.

The Pitt Rivers Museum current research on African restitution involves three programmes each focused on supporting efforts to return African cultural heritage currently held in European museums and collections to the continent of Africa, on a case-by-case basis.

The Museum Ethnographers Group are compiling current repatriation news and resources in this research board. ​

Akrafo-konmu. ‘Soul washers’ or akrafos of the Asante kingdom are attendants of the Asantehene (king) and are responsible for the purification of his soul, the replenishing of his powers and to shield him against evil directed towards him. The Akrafokonmu was looted during the sacking of Kumasi by British forces in 1874. It is now part of the Burrell Collection, Glasgow Museums. During the invasion, division and colonisation of Africa during second half of 19th C loot was taken in abundance to U
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This page contains resources that look at decolonial practice, sometimes referred to as decolonisation, in museums and galleries.

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